Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski
8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 
Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”
Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 
Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.
View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
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Artist Spotlight: Erin Graboski

8 years ago, Pan’s Labyrinth beguiled and terrified moviegoers with its dark fantasy world. Today, I’m reminded a lot of that movie experience when I look at Erin Graboski’s photos. There’s one common theme throughout her work and it’s darkness; her fantasy worlds pull me in and I lose myself in her imagination. 

Erin is a self-taught fine art photographer based in Denver who started photography at the age of 15. She started off by taking landscapes and eventually discovered conceptual photography that she excels in today. “I love how I’m able to create stories and different worlds with each of my images,” she explains. Erin wants her photography to be a source of inspiration and escape for her viewers. “It’s such an amazing feeling for someone to tell you that your work inspired them to create their own art, especially since other artists I admire inspire me to create too. I want my story-lines in my images to create an escape for my viewers like it creates an escape for me to create them.”

Her creative process starts when her mind gets lost in itself and she sees different images she wants to create in her mind. Her planning process usually includes a quick sketch and short description, then she’s out on location doing what she does best. 

Music is a big part of Erin’s creation process and the music she adds to her photos create an atmosphere you can just sink into. “I think it adds to the experience of viewing photos by enhancing how you want your art to be viewed. I like to pair a lot of music that I listen to while creating and thinking about ideas,” she says.

View Erin’s profile on Ubersnap.

Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
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Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
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Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen
There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.
Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.
Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 
Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”
View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.
Zoom
Info

Artist Spotlight: Ares Nguyen

There’s something utterly magical about conceptual photography. Photography has never been about the accurate representation of the world; rather, it’s an interpretation through the eyes of the photographer. Conceptual photographers take this idea and run with it to the finish line. They create new worlds that don’t exist anywhere except in their minds and bring them into reality through their craft.

Ares Nguyen is one such creator who documents his mental states through his fantastical images, mainly centred around the themes of solitude and melancholy. With his photography, Ares wants his viewers to “relate themselves to my photos if possible, since it’s just my current feeling. If my viewers match it, it could make them feel somehow like me in a particular situation.” To him, the most important thing that photos should deliver is a feeling or mood, and the ability to add music to his photos on Ubersnap helps him achieve that.

Every photo starts its life as an idea, which Ares draws into a sketchbook that he brings everywhere with him. “Whenever an idea pops up, I quickly sketch it down as simple lines and drawings, and write some notes about the details,” he explains. “When you plan for your concept, it must be detailed. When it’s detailed, it means you have given thought on how you will do it. It will be straightforward for the next step, which is planning for the photoshoot. You will know what you have to take, where and who. After that, the rest is just Photoshop. I think the techniques to process photos like layer mask, cutting and color blending are easy and learnable. It’s all about the idea.” 

Inspiration for ideas takes many forms. For Ares, it comes from his life, songs, movies or quotes. He is also inspired by the works of Joel Robison, Rosie Hardy, Fiddle Oak and others. “I’m just an aspiring photographer, therefore I haven’t thought anything about a commercial photography career. I just want keep it up with conceptual photography, and probably involve myself in more close-up portraiture in the future.”

View Ares’ profile on Ubersnap.

It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
Zoom
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
Zoom
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
Zoom
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It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
Zoom
Info
It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.
Zoom
Info

It’s incredibly rare to find photos that can make me laugh, but that’s exactly what Stefan Klein has done with this delightful series. “Fundstücke” is a throwback to the days when we would embellish a picture of our friends with a well-placed booger, using a pencil - we have apps for that nowadays. Infused with dry humour, these photos are captioned and coloured over; some are subtle, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed this series, more than I probably should.

I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 
(via Juxtapoz)
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I always love me some conceptual photography and Sean Mundy’s work is as good as it gets. His photos are wonderful and fantastical and you always get the sense that there’s a deeper meaning behind them. In fact, Sean loves when his artwork is left open to interpretation, creating more questions than answers. 

(via Juxtapoz)

It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
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It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info
It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.
I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.
Zoom
Info

It’s not quite Halloween yet but hey, I thought I’d kick things off early. “Sea Monsters” by Damian VanCamp is a series that will get your spine tingling. These creatures aren’t actually real (thank god); rather, they were pieced together by parts of actual sea life to showcase human fear. I’m not sure if that would make you feel better, but it demonstrates the idea that it’s not the unknown that’s fearful; it’s what our imaginations project onto what we don’t know that makes us afraid.

I still think the ocean is pretty freaky though. You know how the saying goes - when you step into the ocean, you’re stepping off the top of the food chain.

Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
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Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info
Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.
Zoom
Info

Alright, raise your hand if photographing light streaks and paintings was one of the first things you did when you started photography. This must be one of the cliches in photography, so it was a surprise for me to see it so tastefully done. “Light Drawings” by Tobias Hutzler seems to take its cue from minimalism, with the ability to even surprise me at times. This visual style is reflected in most of Tobias’ work, which is well worth checking out.

First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info
First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.
Zoom
Info

First, we had a project on people who looked like fruits; but if that’s a little too healthy for you, check this out. In “The Donut Doppleganger”, Kristyna Archer compares people to, you guessed it, donuts. According to her, it seemed so nonsensical at the time, but she had to get out of my mind. Hey, I wouldn’t mind seeing more nonsensical projects from her.

How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
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How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info
How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.
Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 
Zoom
Info

How much can you carry on your head? Not much I reckon, and certainly not a baby lamb. But these are common sights on the roads of East Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia and beyond.

Like ants with impeccable balance, these men and women seem to carry all their life on their heads as they head to and from the market. Floriane de Lassee covers these remarkable people in a playful tribute with a deeper meaning - it’s a look at the weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological. 

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