We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
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We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
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We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
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We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info
We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 
Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.
Zoom
Info

We love this remarkable story of Mike Brodie - starting from 2004, Mike first started photographing with a Polaroid camera. He spent the next 4 years circumambulating the U.S. and amassing an archive of American travel photography. He would go on to receive the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists. 

Then, just as suddenly as he started photography, he quit it. Mike now works as a mobile diesel mechanic in his silver ‘93 Dodge Ram.

Introducing a New and Easy Way to Add Music to Your Photos - Share the Emotion of Your Moments

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Music is a part of everyone’s life - it arouses our emotions more powerfully than any language can. When you combine music and photography, you create something magical. Imagine a dreamy soundtrack for that beautiful landscapea happy song for pictures of that party, or adding a little Brazilian flavour to that vacation photo

Over at Ubersnap, we have been experimenting with different ways people use photography for creativity and self-expression. Today, we’re super excited to announce a new feature that makes it ridiculously easy to add music to your photos. Search through millions of songs (and browse songs by mood!) to find the perfect soundtrack for sharing the emotion of your moments. Here is how it works:

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Over 25 Million Songs

We wanted to make sure that you would be able to find a song for any occasion; that’s why we are working with 7digital to provide a catalogue of over 25 million songs. That’s a lot of songs! 

A New Photo Sharing Experience

The feature is now live on Ubersnap and you can start adding music to your photos, for free.

We are imagining a whole new photo sharing experience and we want you to be a part of it. When you join Ubersnap, you’re joining a collective of talented and creative artists. Most importantly, we want to have a little fun with photography.

Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
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Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
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Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info
Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 
Zoom
Info

Have you heard of the movie, Boyhood? It was shot over 12 years to follow the coming of age of the protagonist. Amy Elkins is doing something similar with the series, Lucas. A boy whom she met at the age of 12, she has been photographing him every 3-4 months since. It’s fascinating to see the changes in his wardrobe and the way he interacts with the camera as he matures through adolescence. 

TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
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TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
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TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
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TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info

TOKYO KINGYO is a series by Michiko Makino which juxtaposes scenes of Tokyo with images of aquarium goldfish. In the same way that goldfish have no conception of themselves beyond the aquarium walls, humans too have a hard time envisioning a world beyond their own. The double exposures show that everything has 2 sides - beauty and ugliness, vice and virtue, light and darkness.

(via Lenscratch)

The Ubersnap Cheat Sheet: 5 Things You Need to Read and Watch This Week

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Four months after the tragic disappearance of a Malaysian jet in the Indian Ocean, a Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 crashed in eastern Ukraine killing all 298 aboard. According to Ukrainian and US officials, the plane was shot down by a Russian-made antiaircraft missile. The Big Picture summarises the tragedy in pictures.

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It’s pretty common practice for colleges to put their courses online for free. We now have a free course on documentary photography and photojournalism by MIT, packed full of useful information for anyone interested in the topic. This resource is simply too good not to share.

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Tearjerker alert, so don’t say you haven’t been warned. Here are photos of Dukey and his last day with his adopted human family, in the form of a letter called I Died Today. Who’s been cutting onions around here?

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Elvis Presley may have left the building, but the King is still very much alive (in spirit, that is). For months, photographer Alfred Wertheimer followed Elvis everywhere, photographing him almost incessantly. What results is a personal and up-close look at a playful, smooth and horny young man at the very beginning of his incredible career.image

Tim Flach is a fantastic animal photographer and “More Than Human” is a stunning example of his approach. In this series, he removes animals from their natural habitat and places them in his studio, taking the photos in the style of human portraiture. The intimate images illuminate the similarities between animal and human emotions, and is meant to question how we shape nature and how it shapes us.

Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
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Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info
Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.
The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.
Zoom
Info

Falling into the Day is an ongoing project about David Blackburn, an accomplished artist living with Alzheimer’s disease. For the last 5 years, Christopher Nunn has been photographing David in his home, his studio, and subsequently the care home where he now lives.

The photos reveal the subtle ways in which the condition can manifest itself - a note with instructions on how to open and lock the door, a forgotten and misplaced lightbulb, and a long dead plant left in the vase. It’s quite heartbreaking.

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