There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
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There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
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There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info
There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.
(via Lenscratch)
Zoom
Info

There’s something magical about the idea of moving away from the city and living in isolation; time slows down and life is simple. In this work in progress, Antoine Bruy hitchhikes throughout Europe to meet the people who have done exactly that. His photos show their pursuit of utopia through empirical attempts, occasional errors and unstable living quarters made from recovered materials.

(via Lenscratch)

Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info
Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki
Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.
Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?
My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 
For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.
What is your approach to street photography?
I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 
This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?
That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.
I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 
You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?
I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 
Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?
I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.
After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.
Thanks Kristoff!
View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website
Zoom
Info

Artist Spotlight: Krzysztof Wierzbicki

Krzysztof is a humanitarian photographer from Poland who uses photography to give a voice to the poor and underprivileged. He has traveled to some of the most gritty places in Cambodia to highlight not just the poverty of the people, but their dignity and will to survive.

Hey Kristoff! How did you get into photography?

My journey started when I was 13 and I attended photography activities in my school. I learnt how to look at the world from the eyes of a photographer and rediscovered my city as a fantastic, even magical place. It was full of contrasts - splendidly located in the mountains but in deep crisis after the closing of the coal mines. Picturesque old streets were full of sad people with no hope for a better future; at least, that was how I saw it as a 13-year-old kid. It’s difficult to describe, but for me Walbrzych was the source of a particular visual sensibility that stuck to me for good. 

For many years, I treated photography as a hobby. Then in 2012, I took part in a workshop led by Zoriah Miller, the great war photographer.

What is your approach to street photography?

I usually spend too little time at one place to make friends with my subjects, so I try to go unnoticed instead. I use a small camera to be less visible; people who are not aware of being photographed are obviously more natural and real. 

This particular image is very striking to me - a man walking down a street holding a handgun. What is the story behind it?

That picture was taken in the streets of Saigon. I like it because it forces the viewer to stop and think, what is going on here? Is that a young criminal just before a robbery? Or a kid handling a plastic toy-gun? What is real in this picture? I like that ambiguity so forgive me but I’m not going to tell a story behind that picture.

I like to think of Saigon as a place where the truth mixes with fiction; where nothing is clear and chaos and uncertainty reigns. That’s how I remember that city with 2 names. Looking at the whole series, “Streets of Saigon”, the people are like ghosts or angels or demons. Perhaps, only the scared rat which was hiding in a hole in the pavement was real. 

You worked on a project called “Life and Work at Dump”, where you documented the lives of some of the 2000 people living in a waste dump in Cambodia. What is the motivation behind it?

I worked on that project during Zoriah’s workshop. My personal motivation was to learn how to photograph in difficult situations and approach difficult subjects; for example, people living in extreme poverty in the slums. 

Of course, photojournalists don’t go to places like the slums for the pleasure of taking photos. Perhaps it sounds too noble or naive, but the main motivation for doing a project like this is my deep belief that what is happening there should be shown to the public.

These pictures are the voice of the people. Sometimes, that voice reaches somebody and pushes him or her to think and maybe even to act. 

What do you want to achieve with your photography?

I believe my series “Life and Work at Dump”, and others like “Cambodian Workers” and “Cambodian Family Portraits”, show something more than poverty in the Third World. They show dignity. It’s amazing how proud these people are, when they often have nothing except themselves and their will to survive.

After publishing my pictures of Cambodia, I received an e-mail from a music teacher in England. He wrote, “(…)I just wanted to say, I found your work amazing, gritty, truthful and at times uncomfortable and humbling. But what you are saying needs to be said, there is so much injustice in the world.(…)” 

Saying what needs to be said - this is my motivation not only for this project, but for humanitarian photography in general.

And if I photograph to say what should be said, then I would like to take pictures good enough to make people listen.

Thanks Kristoff!

View Kristoff’s profile: Ubersnap | Website

"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
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"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
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"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
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"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info
"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.
Zoom
Info

"Performers" is a series of portraits by Patrick Morarescu, depicting performance artists from all over the world. The photos were taken right after the artists get off stage, so they still had their costumes and props on. Some of the outfits are baffling bordering on inexplicable; what the heck were they performing? We’re not sure if we want to know.

If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info
If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.
Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 
See the full series.
Zoom
Info

If there’s ever a reason to shop at a thrift shop, it’s this. Troy Farah has just released scans of slides he bought at a surplus store into the public domain. The photographer and date of the photos are unknown, but it’s clear from the photos that they were taken for 4-H, a youth organisation from the United States. The photos show youths engaged in various group activities in a camp, a large convention and a John Lennon-ish musician serenading the camera.

Origins aside, the photos are a fantastic throwback to the past, when shaggy mops and big glasses were still fashionable. 

See the full series.

The Ubersnap Cheat Sheet: 5 Things You Need to Read and Watch This Week

The story of the week belongs to the winners of the first drone aerial photo contest, and this photo in particular. Drone photography is still in its infancy, but we expect to see more stunning aerial photos as drones become cheaper and more accessible. In the words of National Geographic, the world doesn’t look the same from above.

It’s an understatement to say that hummingbirds are not an easy subject to capture. On average, they flap their wings 50 times per second - so fast that it creates a humming sound, and they just won’t stay still! That’s why these macro shots of hummingbirds by Chris Morgan are so remarkable. Get an up close look at these beautiful creatures and their multi-coloured iridescent feathers.

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Urban ruins? Check. Nude self-portraits? Check. Miru Kim is a New York-based artist who combines both in her exploration of abandoned subway stations, tunnels, sewers, catacombs, factories, hospitals, and shipyards. NSFW maybe, but very tastefully done.

imageWe have seen our fair share of surfing videos, but this one takes the cake and the icing on top of it. Teaming up with professional surfers, Chris Burkard travels to the Arctic Circle to document the adventure of surfing in frigid, subzero temperatures. With only a thin layer of rubber separating them from the icy waters, it’s amazing to see how willing they were to sacrifice comfort in the hopes of achieving the pinnacle of adrenalin and aesthetics. 

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"Middle-aged mom" is one of the least sexy labels you can give to anyone, but that is the reality for millions of women around the world. Andi Schreiber documents her life as a 40-year-old who has continued to feel young and sexual, even though society has closed those roles to her.

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